My pajero's Superpower


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Jakeswenz
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu May 11, 2017 4:56 pm
Vehicle: Pajero gen2 3.5 V6 1997
Country: South Africa
Location: Komga, Eastern Cape

Re: My pajero's Superpower

Postby Jakeswenz Fri May 12, 2017 12:45 pm

You could try the papertest:

...or simply do your own using a piece of unwaxed white card. Let a drop of oil from the end of the dipstick fall onto a piece of card. Keep the piece of card suspended by the edges so that the part with the oil spot does not touch a surface. Leave the card in a horizontal position for twenty minutes or so.

Healthy oil should appear be translucent when held up to the light.

If it is opaque-and has a jagged edge then the oil is severely oxidised. This could be due to excessive heat, or due to the presence if glycol (antifreeze) which oxidises oil very quickly and is far more deleterious to oil than water.

Fuel dilution is manifested by light coloured halos around the main oil spot.

For diesel engines, you are mainly concerned by the ability of the oil to hold soot in suspension. If you see clumps of soot particles forming, then the oil is saturated with soot.

Use a card with a drop of new engine oil for comparison.

I keep regular checks and date them to monitor the deteriation of the oil. The results are interesting. After a long motorway journey (>200 miles) the oil always shows additional oxidation and the fuel dilution decreases markedly. During winter, with a diet of short journeys, the fuel dilution increases significantly.

It's a very old field test that is starting to be revisited.





Or try a flash point test: take a spoonful of old oil vs spoonful of new oil, heat both samples with naked flame and see which burns first, diesel has a much lower flash than oil, so should burn before the new oil sample.


Hope that helps
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mrclauds
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2017 9:22 am
Vehicle: Mitsubishi Pajero 2004 GLS LWB
Country: South Africa

Re: My pajero's Superpower

Postby mrclauds Mon May 15, 2017 12:21 pm

Thanks guys
That's some really useful and great info! :)
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mrclauds
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2017 9:22 am
Vehicle: Mitsubishi Pajero 2004 GLS LWB
Country: South Africa

Re: My pajero's Superpower

Postby mrclauds Tue May 16, 2017 4:43 pm

So here we have the test as suggested...
Paj oil.jpg
Results of blot test


As all can see, I do have some diesel contamination, however considering the sump is 9.6l and i've drained around 2 sumpy containers (how many liters is a green sumpy?) without filling with more oil and its full again, that means it should theoretically have a lot of diesel if that was the issue...
However the image shows very very little diesel halo ring, and I would expect a lot more for the amount right?

So next I look at the jagged edges just inside the diesel halo... That screams overused oil or anti freeze or water right?
Since this oil has only done +-3000km, doubt its the oil problem... however i did have some overheating while pulling a heavy trailer loaded with bikes (+- 800kg), up long hills, 36 deg and radiator full of grass seeds blocking air flow (only found out after). Which might explain the oil degradation?

I looked at my coolant bottle, it has not moved in liquid height since I first noticed this problem a little while ago (+-2000km), and surely I would have seen that many liters change? (under radiator cap is also full so cap is working as expected)
Also no bubbles in the radiator cap area when car is running, nor milkyness or foaming in radiator or under oil cap... However I did see some steam escaping from the oil cap when I opened it after a drive... Thought that was strange? could be water evaporating?

So since I am no closer to logically coming to a conclusion, unless someone smarter than me points out something im missing, Ive sent a sample of used and unused oil to the lab to get analysed...
Should have an answer by next week and ill post so others can learn from this too :)
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peterpot
Posts: 293
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2016 3:42 pm
Vehicle: 2009 Pajero 3.2 SWB
Country: SA
Location: Pretoria

Re: oil on paper test

Postby peterpot Wed May 17, 2017 8:36 am

Now this is the first time I have ever had to gauge a sample from a photo but from what I can see it certainly looks like a lot of diesel. Simply the fact that your sump capacity "grew" by about double its size confirms that. I certainly would not drive the engine with that amount of diesel in the engine oil.
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mrclauds
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2017 9:22 am
Vehicle: Mitsubishi Pajero 2004 GLS LWB
Country: South Africa

Re: My pajero's Superpower

Postby mrclauds Thu May 18, 2017 12:39 pm

Hey guys

Thanks for all the feedback...
Got my results back from the lab... you guys were right...
Luckily this isn't a daily driver so has done very very little distance in this state... On the bright side, im expecting to have my fuel consumption improve :)
Ill be draining it completely and filling with new oil to get it to the mechanic :)

Attached is the lab results if anyone is interested :)
2 results, 1 is the comparison sample, other is used oil
20170518_124045_resized.jpg
Oil Test 1

20170518_124033_resized.jpg
Oil Test 2
Sean Carritt
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2017 8:46 pm
Vehicle: 1991 Mitsubishi Pajero v6 3litre 3 door,
Country: Zambia

Re: My pajero's Superpower

Postby Sean Carritt Fri May 19, 2017 8:04 pm

I would have to say it's definately diesel. Either its a leaking seal in front of the injector pump. We had the same problem on a very old Mercedes Benz 671 7tonne truck. In this case there was a leaking banjo bolt going into the injectors inside the tappet cover. I did the repair myself. I had drained out over 20litres out the sump and replaced with new oil. The trick would go out on a delivery and come back with the sump filled at over 20 litres when I clearly only put in 10 litres to fill the sump to the max level each time. And I had recorded the amount of oil I had put in in the stores book. After we sorted the leak the problem was solved. But you must definately have diesel leaking into the oil. This must be attended to immediately otherwise your engine is going to fail with a complete engine seizure. From several failed engine components esp your main and big end bearings on your crankshaft. Otherwise you will be kissing your beloved pajero goodbye. So it's best to stop using the car until it's repaired.

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