Two Stroke Oil In the Diesel

EricS
Country: South Africa
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Two Stroke Oil In the Diesel

Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:51 am

Sorry for this post i know there is a lot of posts on this subject.

However the 2 questions I have :

1. What type (specification) of two stoke oil should be used, there are a lot of different specification for two stroke oil?
2. What dilution should be used, or just 200ml every time you fill up.

Whether it works or not is subject to everyone's own ideas.


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KurtG
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Re: Two Stroke Oil In the Diesel

Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:56 pm

I assume you are asking in relation to your two stroke petrol lawnmower?
- Kurt
2014 Pajero SWB 3.2 GLS | EFS Suspension | Stofpad Bashplates
2008 Pajero LWB 3.2 GLS (Sold @ 243,000km)
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Roelf_le_Roux
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Re: Two Stroke Oil In the Diesel

Wed Oct 09, 2019 7:04 pm

Jaco FC grade. Castrol is good.
100ml per 50L diesel.

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EricS
Country: South Africa
Vehicle: 2005 Pajero 3.2 DI D SWB
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Re: Two Stroke Oil In the Diesel

Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:53 pm

Roelf_le_Roux wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 7:04 pm
Jaco FC grade. Castrol is good.
100ml per 50L diesel.

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Thanks Roelf, just cant seem to find it on the south coast. Question can I use autolube marine out board two stoke oil. It does not give a specification. I still about 20lt from when I had the boat.
EricS
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Vehicle: 2005 Pajero 3.2 DI D SWB
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Re: Two Stroke Oil In the Diesel

Thu Oct 10, 2019 9:03 am

KurtG wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:56 pm
I assume you are asking in relation to your two stroke petrol lawnmower?
Yip the big silver four wheeled one....
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OBELIX123
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Re: Two Stroke Oil In the Diesel

Sun Oct 13, 2019 8:48 am

Maybe I missed something during my last 55 years of driving a motor vehicle (8 years of those were Diesels and of those 3 years were naturally aspirated Diesels.

Can someone please explain, what are the reasons for people putting 2 stroke oil into their Diesel tank on a regular basis ?
I see a very god reason in using fully synthetic engine oil for every oil change because it breaks down much later (retains good lubrication qualities much longer ) and can take higher engine oil temperatures compared to normal oil. But 2 stroke oil ??
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KurtG
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Re: Two Stroke Oil In the Diesel

Sun Oct 13, 2019 12:03 pm

I believe it’s got something to do with lubricity because there is an opinion that modern diesel no longer has enough of it. I would love to get the opinion from a qualified tribologist on this matter.
- Kurt
2014 Pajero SWB 3.2 GLS | EFS Suspension | Stofpad Bashplates
2008 Pajero LWB 3.2 GLS (Sold @ 243,000km)
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OBELIX123
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Re: Two Stroke Oil In the Diesel

Sun Oct 13, 2019 12:53 pm

Has it to do with the demise of 500ppm ?? Because manufacturers of modern Diesel engines do forbid the use of 500ppm....or at best do allow it only in emergencies...
This question came up a few years back with the introduction of 50 ppm and even 10 ppm.
I remember very clearly that the oil companies ALL confirmed that lubricity of Diesel was not affected by the changeover and that sufficient lubricants are in fact added to the Diesel fuel..
If that is not so, we should initiate CLASS ACTION and charge the oil companies with gross negligence and willful destruction of property (Diesel engines).
I maintain that you prolong the life of a diesel engine (in a motor vehicle) by absolutely adhering to the prescribed oil change intervals and not exceed those by more than 300km and as a minimum, use the prescribed engine oil (the grade...not necessarily the oil manufacturer)
If you really love your engine use fully synthetic engine oil.......
And thirdly, don't drive your diesel engine like a Ferrari (or similar) engine....
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Roelf_le_Roux
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Re: Two Stroke Oil In the Diesel

Sun Oct 13, 2019 5:09 pm

There is nothing wrong with low sulphur diesel as supplied by the big companies. There was a period when engine failure occured with low sulphur diesel and research quickly picked up on the lubricity loss during sulphur removal. International minimum lubricity standards were set and lubricants are now added to diesel to meet those standards.
Low ash 2SO apparently has the ability to remove carbon buildup in the combustion chamber and downstream from there (turbo) as well. I have come across enough "testimony" and anecdotal evidence to believe that claim. If you buy into this carbon story, then why not add 2SO once or twice a year when you hit the long road. One bottle over two tanks should be more than enough to sort out the little carbon buildup that may have formed.
I have seen that much discussed "Sasol report" where the benefit of 2SO is trashed. It shows no significant added lubricity of forecourt diesel with added 2SO and postulates Zn precipitation in the injectors due to 2SO.
What isn't addressed in that report is how 2SO adds lubricity to diesel that is contaminated with water, paraffin or even petrol.
My personal position is that during everyday use, with normal diesel from good garages, that 2SO is a waste of money. When traveling in the outback and diesel is acquired from dodgy outlets, why not put on those braces and add some 2SO?
A modern car with CAT and DPF will most likely complain after a while if you feed it too much 2SO. The sulphur and heavy metals in 2SO will affect those units and is exactly why the oil and diesel manufacturers are trying to keep sulphur and metals away from our cars.


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Tony M
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Re: Two Stroke Oil In the Diesel

Sun Oct 13, 2019 6:47 pm

500 ppm diesel has been in use for decades. However, with tightening of legislation world-wide to reduce Sulphur Dioxide levels it has been necessary to reduce the sulphur content of the Diesel from 500 to 50 and now (in some areas) down to 5 ppm or less.
The reduction in sulphur was achieved by the 'hydrodesulfurization' process. What was not understood in the initial production was that this process also reduced the lubricity of Diesel fuel. As usual, this was found out by customers when engines started to fail.
So the oil companies and standards authorities devised some tests for lubricity that (they never do fully) replicate the conditions in a diesel engine. So the oil companies started to put in 'lubricity modifiers' directly into their diesel to ensure that these test specifications are met (specs were set on 50 ppm diesel from memory).
So, theoretically, the lower sulphur content diesels should now show the same lubricity values as the 50 ppm varieties - unless otherwise proven.
However motorists do put 'additive's into their oil for a number of expectations: improved lubricity, injector cleaning, water removal etc.
Anything that gets combusted in a closed container (e.g. cylinder) should leave as little residue as possible for obvious reasons. Fuels do have an 'ash content', determined by a number of test methods, to show they're not going to leave too much residue in the cylinder. Some might well get 'blown out' through the exhaust but I suspect not all. But there will also be other 'crud' remaining if the fuel is not fully burnt on ignition.
The problem that I see with using lubricating oils in diesel is that some contain 'organic' metal salts, added for specific purposes for specific applications. One of the 2SOs mentioned in forums contains a Calcium based Organic compound for (as far as I can find out) 'detergency'. The organic part will get burnt during combustion but some of the Calcium might end up deposited in the cylinder, probably as Calcium Oxide. If this 'glows' when heated to diesel combustion temperatures it might cause a 'hot spot' and pre-ignition of the fuel. But then this is an 'if' scenario. Under actual operating conditions it might not present a problem.
Ultimately, if one is looking for a lubricant to add to one's diesel then I would suggest that one adds an additive specific for that purpose, which will probably (no guarantees from my part!) not have metal salts in it - i.e. totally 'organic' in nature - just to be on the safe side.
Some references:
On Lubricity: https://fueloilnews.com/2010/03/04/taki ... lubricity/
On Diesel itself (excellent if you have the time to read): https://www.chevron.com › chevron › documents › diesel-fuel-tech-review

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